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Projects 2010-2014

Study Abroad: The Assessment of Cultural Intelligence

Study Abroad: The Assessment of Cultural Intelligence

Study Abroad: The Assessment of Cultural Intelligence

peter-ecke.jpgProject Director: Dr. Peter Ecke (U Arizona)
Description: Study abroad has become an increasingly important part in students’ development of language and cultural skills. A key outcome of study abroad is learning about the other culture and the development of “cultural intelligence” which is understood here as “the ability to engage in a set of behaviors that uses skills (i.e., language or interpretational skills) and qualities (e.g., tolerance for ambiguity, flexibility) that are tuned appropriately to the culture-based values and attitudes of the people with whom one interacts (Peterson, 2004, p. 89).” To date, few instruments exist to assess gains in cultural intelligence during study abroad.
The proposed project will address the need for ready-to use, easily adaptable instruments and tasks to assess students’ development of cultural intelligence during study abroad.
Peterson’s concept of “cultural intelligence” which encompasses three main components (2004, p. 13): (a) knowledge about cultures (facts and cultural traits), (b) awareness (of oneself and others) and © specific skills (behaviors) will provide the framework to develop these instruments. The assessment instruments will include questionnaires, learner portfolios/journals, and simulation games in which learners analyze and resolve critical incidents that frequently occur during study abroad.


PErCOLATE: Topic-based Modules for Preparing the Future FL Professoriate to Teach with a Multiliteracies Approach across the Undergraduate FL Curriculum.

PErCOLATE: Topic-based Modules for Preparing the Future FL Professoriate to Teach with a Multiliteracies Approach across the Undergraduate FL Curriculum.

PErCOLATE: Topic-based Modules for Preparing the Future FL Professoriate to Teach with a Multiliteracies Approach across the Undergraduate FL Curriculum.

dupuy.jpgheather-allen.jpg Projects Directors: Drs. Heather Allen (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Beatrice Dupuy (U Arizona) [In collaboration with CLAS, CMES, and CALPER].
Description: The long-standing collegiate FL teacher training paradigm with its short-term focus on methodologies and techniques for teaching lower-level language courses has been viewed–particularly by Language Program Directors (LPDs)–as woefully inadequate for preparing tomorrow’s professoriate to teach in increasingly diverse programmatic contexts. Further, given the 2007 MLA Report calling for a more coherent curriculum in which “language, literature, and culture are taught as a continuous whole” (p. 3), shifts in the content of FL graduate students' professional development as teachers are overdue.

As a response to the shortcomings previously noted, this project proposes to develop a set of modules for professional development of teaching assistants (TAs) in several languages that will supplement the model of professional development already in place by adding flexible materials and activities that focus on language teaching at higher levels and provide an alternative structure for professional development in programs where there is either a Language Program Director (LPD) with no applied linguistics background or no LPD at all (the norm in most LCTL language programs).

The approach to FL teaching and learning foregrounded in these modules will be based on multiliteracies (Kern, 2000; The New London Group, 1996). Lesson study, a self-directed, collaborative, inquiry-based learning approach will provide a framework to guide FL TAs’ reflective examination of their instructional practices and students’ learning as they work through a module.

Materials


Modern Persian Textbook Series: Advanced

Modern Persian Textbook Series: Advanced

Modern Persian Textbook Series: Advanced

kamrantalatoff.jpgProject Director: Dr. Kamran Talattof (U Arizona)
Description: The political and educational climate of the world in the year 2010 speaks most clearly to the extreme need to develop instructional materials in Persian (aka Farsi), the official language of Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan and is also spoken in other communities in Central Asia. Despite the growing popularity of Persian courses on American campuses, the instructional materials currently available are either dated or unsuitable for English-speaking second language learners.
This project will produce the last two volumes in a series of six, designed to teach Persian to college students or independent learners (the first two volumes, at the introductory level, were published by the Yale University Press in 2005 and the next two, at the intermediate level, will be published by CERCLL this summer). The new textbooks will assist FL teachers of Persian in teaching students to read, write, listen and speak at the intermediate level and provide a foundation for an increased understanding of colloquial Persian. The textbooks will teach both spoken and written formats, and will provide students with information about aspects of Iranian culture so that the language and culture are connected.


Projects 2006-2010

Arabic Learners Written Corpus: A Resource for Research and Learning

Arabic Learners Written Corpus: A Resource for Research and Learning

Arabic Learners Written Corpus: A Resource for Research and Learning

Project Director: Dr. Samira Farwaneh (U Arizona) [In collaboration with the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Center for Advanced Language Proficiency Education and Research (CALPER) at Pennsylvania State University]
Description: This project will develop an extensive Arabic learner corpus comprising numerous written samples produced by L2 and heritage students, collected over 15 years of teaching. They will be transcribed into a database with cross-referenced categories according to level (beginning, intermediate, advanced), learner (L2 vs. heritage), and genre (description, narration, instruction). The corpus will serve as a source of empirical data for hypothesis testing as well as a resource for developing materials for teaching Arabic. Once it is completed in Summer 2010, it will be made available through the CERCLL and CMES websites, and will be offered to the Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) for dissemination nationally. A Spring 2010 workshop/demonstration took place at the Western Consortium of Middle East National Resource Centers' Language Workshop.

Materials


Heritage Languages: An Ethnographic Base for Assessment Tools

Heritage Languages: An Ethnographic Base for Assessment Tools

Heritage Languages: An Ethnographic Base for Assessment Tools

javierduran.jpgProject Director: Dr. Javier Duran (U Arizona) [In collaboration with the Center for Latin American Studies]
Description: Research indicates that the pedagogical needs of heritage language students are fundamentally different from those of second language learners. The primary goal of this project is to use ethnographic data in order to identify the cultural knowledge that separates heritage learners from second language learners, which then can be used to create an assessment instrument. Fieldwork in the Tucson area will involve ethnographic observations of classroom experiences, individual sociolinguistic interviews with students, and focus groups with teachers. Scheduled for completion in Summer 2010, this project will result in the development of a model for assessing heritage language users that incorporates a computer-based instrument tool and the use of ethnographic data as a basis for determining college placement. This model will then be applicable to other heritage language situations, including LCTLs. The model will be disseminated through local workshops for community college and university teachers and nation-wide through the CERCLL website.


Modern Persian Textbook Series: Intermediate

Modern Persian Textbook Series: Intermediate

Modern Persian Textbook Series: Intermediate

kamrantalatoff.jpgProject Director: Dr. Kamran Talattof (U Arizona)
Description: The political and educational climate of the world in the year 2010 speaks most clearly to the extreme need to develop instructional materials in Persian (aka Farsi), the official language of Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan and is also spoken in other communities in Central Asia. Despite the growing popularity of Persian courses on American campuses, the instructional materials currently available are either dated or unsuitable for English-speaking second language learners.
This project will produce the last two volumes in a series of six, designed to teach Persian to college students or independent learners (the first two volumes, at the introductory level, were published by the Yale University Press in 2005 and the next two, at the intermediate level, will be published by CERCLL this summer). The new textbooks will assist FL teachers of Persian in teaching students to read, write, listen and speak at the advanced level and provide a foundation for an increased understanding of colloquial Persian. The textbooks will teach both spoken and written formats, and will provide students with information about aspects of Iranian culture so that the language and culture are connected.

Materials

mp.jpgModern Persian: Written and Spoken - Intermediate Texts, Volumes I and II - Kamran Talatoff
The Intermediate Texts (Volumes I and II) offer extended vocabulary, grammar, and essays on aspects of Iranian culture. They expose learners to an extended vocabulary and grammatical range in both spoken and written formats, while teaching all levels of formality and informality. Both volumes are available for purchase. Please go to CERCLL's Publications page.


Writing Systems of the World

Writing Systems of the World

Writing Systems of the World

timvance.jpgProject Director: Dr. Timothy Vance (U Arizona)
Description: The goal of this project is to introduce students to the variety of writing systems that have been and are used around the world. This project will result in a carefully designed survey of the types of diverse writing systems that different cultures have developed. The instructional materials will provide modules for Japanese, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, and possibly Korean, and include information on all the writing systems. The two primary target audiences are undergraduate and secondary-school teachers and students. Final products include: individual modules, consisting of introductory notes on the variety of writing systems; lecture notes (available in CD or website format); a student workbook; and a teacher’s manual as an introduction to a language-specific writing system. A summer workshop took place at the University of Arizona to test these materials.

Materials

ws-cover.jpg Writing Systems of the World - Timothy Vance
This manual introduces students to the variety of writing systems that have been and are used around the world by providing a carefully designed survey of the types of diverse writing systems that different cultures have developed. This manual provides modules for Japanese, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, and Korean, and includes information on all the writing systems. The two primary target audiences are undergraduate and secondary-school teachers and students. Student workbook and instructor’s manual are available for purchase. Please go to CERCLL's Publications page.